Let's Make a

Difference Together

My Platform 

 

This pandemic has highlighted that Richmond is at a turning point, and we need to decide what kind of city and community we want to build. The impact of this virus will be with us long after a vaccine. We will feel the social, economic, and environmental repercussions for years to come.  The effects of the pandemic have deeply changed our community, hurting our small businesses, causing job losses and uncertainty, and negatively impacting our mental and physical health. We have an unprecedented opportunity to rebuild from the pandemic focusing on a recovery for everyone.

A successful post-COVID recovery requires a community-first approach. We're in this together.

 

Below are a few of the election platforms I will advocate for:

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Silver Steel Plate

Affordable Housing

  • Foster strategic partnerships with senior levels of government, private and non-profit sectors to build co-operative housing, and purpose-built rental housing that includes subsidized rents. 

  • Develop a rental only zoning policy to increase rental options and protect existing stock. 

  • Ensuring new developments meet a definition of affordability that is aligned with local incomes.

  • Ensuring that an appropriate share of new affordable housing units are designed to support seniors. Richmond has the highest poverty rate for seniors in BC. 

  • Create a renter's advisory board to ensure renters voices are heard.

Environmental Sustainability and Food Security

  • Develop a local, dignified policy response to address food insecurity that includes investing in community small-scale farms and food markets in order to provide affordable options for food security.

  • Create opportunities for renters that do not have access to gardening space, and for low-income people who struggle to access enough nutritious food and should have the ability to grow their own food. The city has made good steps forward by embracing the Richmond Food Recovery Network as a source of policy innovation in food security.

  • Continue the trajectory of leadership in sustainability by expanding district energy systems; protecting the Agricultural Land Reserve; and investing in more livable City options such as biking/walking.

  • Ensure Richmond takes action to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions by 50% by 2030; and work with Metro Vancouver to implement the Clean Air Plan.

  • Revitalizing Richmond’s urban forest; protecting and increasing public green spaces; increasing native plants in public spaces; and investing in food forests.

 

  • Ecological conservation takes active leadership we must protect, nourish, and grow these resources.

  • Partnering with Indigenous communities to protect and restore native ecosystems.

Inclusive Policy

  • Collect and analyze race-based data to ensure all city services are being delivered fairly and without discrimination.

  • Develop anti-racist policy and create an anti-racism committee. Mandatory anti-racism training for all municipal staff. 

  • Implement the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s, Call to Action, for cities. The Federation of Canadian Municipalities has recommended actions for cities to undertake.

  • Increase support for immigrants’ and refugees’ transition to life in Richmond and provide English classes with childcare. Launch a City Immigrant Mentorship Program.

  • Develop a Women’s Equity strategy to bring back women into the workplace.  The pandemic has caused disproportionate harm to women and children. Creating new at-home business categories and support for childcare are needs that the city should respond to.

  • Create an Accessibility Working Group - we need to listen to people facing accessibility issues to guide us in redesigning our infrastructure with everyone in mind.

  • Ensuring that Richmond expands in LGBTQI2S+ inclusion with the creation of a
    resource hub and community space to improve access to health & social services. Ensure Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+) training for council and city staff, and ensure all major City policies, plans and investments.

  • Translating key city documents into more languages, to increase the accessibility for immigrant, refugee, and other non-English speaking residents

Thriving City

  • Supporting small businesses to thrive, post-pandemic, by expanding and investing further in the Business Resilience Program.  Ensure policy and bylaw is adaptive to changing needs, such as the Temporary Patio Program.

  • Ensuring the property taxes are affordable through responsible use of public funds.

  • Expanding Recreation Fee Subsidy Program. Changing from $300 per adult/child and $100 for seniors to, 60 free admissions drop ins at Richmond Recreation Centres. 

  • Working to ensure that all essential services receive the funding they need.

  • Support local farmers, food hubs, removing barriers for food trucks, and other creative improvements will make a huge difference to our local communities.

  • Support free transit initiative to low-income households and seniors.

  • Update Council members Declaration of Assets and Liabilities to be more robust so that voters can have confidence in their elected officials. Financial responsibility means reviewing all aspects of City spending.